Archives for posts with tag: photography

We talk about individual organisms as if there were such a thing. We are made of many. When we look at another organism, we look at an interdependent intertwining group. We need the bacteria inside us, the insects need the plants and the plants need the insects. We all need each other. If you, or I, ever feel lonely, we can remember we are always filled and surrounded by other beings. We are we.

Photo of insect (likely ladybug) eggs on Rosa rugosa by Rebecca Arnoldi

Today I don’t feel clear and bright and open to the sky like the leaves of grass in sunlight. Today I feel more like the dark deep shadowy soil and the violet that grows out of it. Veins looping a flow of sugar and water through thick heart-shaped jagged leaves and thin high stems. Purple petals hold sweetness. Some face the sky, some face the intimate earth.

Why do so many people hate this plant?

Garlic mustard like other “invasives” came from afar (Eurasia in this case). It thrives here and can take over an area. This plant, like many other “invasives”, grows well in areas disturbed by us. It’s roots put out a chemical that damages mycorrhizal fungi that other plants depend on. And deer don’t eat it.

BUT

Don’t worry if you have garlic mustard growing around you. It’s edible! And while it may be bitter it’s super high in vitamin C, E, Zinc, omega -3 fatty acids, calcium and iron.

I just had my first garlic mustard salad! The vinegar, oil and salt helped mitigate the bitterness.

If you do collect some to eat, don’t go too crazy, it has some compounds that might not be good for you in excess.

I say, let’s celebrate this resilient survivor from afar and let’s have some salad!

sources/ resources:

Peter Del Tredici, Wild Urban Plants of the Northeast; John Kallas, Edible Wild Plants

In cold dark times the seeds and spores are hiding in wait… the deep darkness is fertile. Moisture, warmth and light arrive as the sun nears. The trees’ seeds begin to germinate and the mosses capsules get ready to release the spores of spring. Happy St Patrick’s Day!

Last Sunday I hiked through a hemlock forest to a sunny hilltop. I looked at one oak tree and saw many inhabitants. There was a hole with mysterious scat, many lichens, some fungi, and inside a crevice there was a group of beetles sheltered from the cold. They appeared to be dark fireflies. Similar to light producing fireflies but with no light producing organs, these beetles live through the Winter. A tree is more than a tree. We are all more than ourselves.

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Photo by Rebecca Arnoldi

Thanks to the Boston Mycology Club and our fearless leader, Lawrence Millman, sixteen of us braved cold air and strong winds to see all kinds of fungi that are able to survive the drying cold winds. Most, like this Olive-toothed Polypore, inhabit wood. Wood holds more moisture than the ground does, and the real challenge of freezing temperatures and cold winds is the lack of moisture *( *Lawrence Millman)

 

I lay under the Maple tree in a  yoga stretch my breath keeping rhythm. Suddenly a titmouse landed on the privet bush beside me. It began squawking loudly. I lay still, but watched and listened as the bird continued to squawk agitatedly. Another titmouse came over to check out the scene. Then three chickadees came in. Then a  White Breasted Nuthatch,flew to the Maple, walked down it toward me, came in close…they all called, seeming to support the riled up squawker. S/he came over to the Maple, just above my head. We looked at each other; I looked into eyes big, dark, beady. Are you telling me something? Or telling your companions about me? It seemed like  the birds were actually going to perch on me. I moved and they flew off … I wondered, what this bird’s message could be. Did it think I was dead? ;a potential source of insects to eat? Did it think I was in trouble and altruistically trying to notify others to help me? The message I took was this- this old Norway Maple, a tree we have considered cutting down , is old, considered a “weed tree” and could fall on our house. Yet it is full of life and possibility, especially for insect-eating birds like the chickadee, Nuthatch and Titmouse. I took the visit as a plea to leave the tree standing- let it die slowly- let life continue on inside and around it as long as possible… perhaps even after its death, (as dead trees actually have more biomass than live trees and provide great habitat for cavity nesters). And look at yards as habitat. They are home for urban and suburban dwelling wildlife. May we preserve green space in the city. Maybe this was not what the titmouse was saying, but it’s the message I took. Tufter TitmouseNatural history note: Titmice and Nuthatches live mostly off Acorns in Fall and Winter ( there is an oak in the yard) Titmice form long-term pair bonds ( so it could have been a couple). Titmice, nuthatches and chickadees  form mixed species flocks outside of breeding season for enhanced feeding purposes…

1Versatile Blogger Award

Dear Kitty. some blog https://dearkitty1.wordpress.com/has been so generous as to nominate rebeccaarnoldisblog for the Versatile Blogger Award.

Thank you so much, my dear blogger friend! You’ve got a great blog!

The rules of this award are:

1. Thank and link back to the person who awarded you.

2. Nominate up to 15 bloggers for the Versatile Blogger Award and include a link to their site (and tell them that you have nominated them).

3. State 7 things about yourself.

SEVEN THINGS ABOUT ME:

1. I began this blog to encourage myself in a daily practice of art-making, nature observation and writing… I also was recovering from a broken heart and it was a great way to get out of my loneliness and feel that I was sharing something with the world.

2. I began this blog to encourage others to connect with life inside (emotion, breath, body, spirit) and life surrounding (nature).

3. Many of my photos are taken while walking my dog… she teaches me a lot, and maybe some day I will have a blog about her.

4. I’m not a photographer. I’m a painter, never studied photography, and have a point and shoot camera, but strangely enough I post mostly photos. Maybe some day I will study photography, and/or get a digital SLR!

5. I have a meet up group called, yoganatureart adventures. come along!

6. I lead workshops that focus on yoga/body awareness, art-making and nature study,through arnold arboretum,  mass audubon at wellfleet bay, quiet mind yoga studio, yoga east, musketaquid and through the brookline art center, come along! If you know a place that might want to host this type of workshop, please let me know.

7. I love underdog animals. For instance, one that has been bombed and poisoned and still is today, the common crow. I find crows beautiful and fascinating… and they count to 7.

 

 

 

 

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